Lego’s Drivable Toyota Supra Is Half a Million Bricks’ Worth of Awesome

No, that’s not a terribly pixelated image of the GR Supra taken by a late ’90s flip phone. The photo has great resolution, it’s just that the Supra is, in fact, almost entirely built out of standard Lego blocks. The 1:1 scale creation is on display at Japan’s Legoland park, positioned right next to an actual yellow GR Supra for comparison’s sake.

Working Overtime

The painstaking process of piecing together almost half a million blocks to create a full-scale vehicle is only half the story (at roughly 2,400 hours of hard work). But the team spent a full 3,000 hours prior to the build just developing the plans for the massive project. As you might imagine, something like this has to be blueprinted in order to maintain a uniform appearance and keep within the car’s original dimensions for the sake of authenticity.

The working head and taillights are a nice touch, but they might be overshadowed by the insanely intricate work done inside to recreate the shift selector and console, dash, even a passenger seat with proper color-coding—all incredibly well done. A factory GR Supra driver’s seat, steering wheel, pedals, gauge cluster, and infotainment screen are the real deal inside, with the wheels, door handles, and emblems also taken from the Gazoo Racing parts bin for the exterior. The majority of the rest, however, relies on actual Lego bits that total 477,303 pieces—a parent’s worst nightmare.

Not the First, or the Last

Lego has done projects like this previously for the likes of Honda, McLaren, and Bugatti, the latter of which included a series of electric motors to propel a replica Chiron to 12 mph. This Supra also incorporates an electric drive element and will actually outrun the supercar as it tops 17 mph, perhaps a result of being lighter with about half the number of Legos used for completion of the svelte Supra body.

Already on display in Japan, the exhibit will run through October 11 and allows visitors the chance to get an up-close look and an opportunity for a photo with the one-of-a-kind creation.

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