Then Everything Went Black: Limited Dodge Charger Hellcat Gets Dark

Dodge is spicing up the 707-horsepower Charger SRT Hellcat — a car that [sarcasm font] definitely needs additional spiciness — for 2019 with the limited-edition Octane Edition for the full-size performance sedan. Available with only Pitch Black or White Knuckle exterior paint, the appearance package will only be available for the 2019 model year and will add $1,495 to the Hellcat’s $68,740 starting price (including a destination charge).

Related: 2019 Dodge Challenger, Charger Go Green (But Not in an Eco-Friendly Way)

What does that extra 1,500 bucks get you?

  • Full-length black racing stripes with red accents on the outside edges
  • Blacked-out badging on the grille, fender and deck lid
  • A black rear spoiler
  • Black 20-inch wheels that first appeared on the Challenger R/T Scat Pack 1320 (we currently have one of those Challengers in our test fleet at Cars.com’s Chicago headquarters and can vouch that the wheels look good). The wheels also have “knurled-bead seats to minimize tire slip on the wheel under extreme acceleration” — which is a thing you have to consider when your car has more than 700 hp
  • Unique Octane Red brake calipers
  • SRT Performance seats with a houndstooth insert, red stitching and a stitched Hellcat logo
  • Additional red stitching throughout the cabin
  • Red seat belts
  • Gloss-black and additional dark interior accent pieces

The Octane­­­­­ Edition package won’t make the Charger SRT Hellcat any faster but, uh, did we really want that? (Pssst … yes. Make a Demon or Redeye version, Dodge. Delay redesigning the car for another model year or two; it’ll be fine.)

More From Cars.com:

  • Which Cars Fit Three Car Seats?
  • Dodge Charger Hellcat, R/T Scat Pack Get Striped and Strip-Equipped
  • Charged Up for the 2019 Dodge Charger? We Have All the Deets
  • Mild to Wild: Testing the Dodge Charger Hellcat’s Driving Modes

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Source: Read Full Article