An electric Ford Mustang (as in, fastback or convertible) is only a matter of time

Is an electric Ford Mustang coupe, as seen in our rendering, just around the corner?

Some Mustang fans are still getting used to the idea of a Mustang-branded midsize electric crossover, but an electric Mustang coupe or convertible may not be far on the horizon, Motoring reports. The scalable EV platform that will underpin the Mustang Mach-E next year can be shortened or stretched to support a number of bodystyles in rear- and all-wheel-drive configurations, including those of smaller and lighter passenger cars. 

Ford showed off just such a thing at SEMA last month, in the form of the heady, 900-hp Mustang Lithium concept. Perhaps it’s no coincidence that Ford wanted to showcase a traditional Mustang right after the reveal of the crossover EV, which was met with just as much fanfare as skepticism from more orthodox Mustang owners—let’s put it that way. 

When asked about the Mustang Lithium concept, Mustang Mach-E chief engineer Ron Heiser indicated to Motoring that the Mach-E’s platform will underpin several EVs, some of which will wear the Mustang badge and some that won’t.

“I can’t speak to that (Mustang Lithium concept). But I think if you look out in the future—who knows what timeframe that is—the market is eventually going to roll over to EVs,” Heiser told Motoring.

The Ford Mustang Lithium is a one-off all-electric pony car.

Note the lack of tailpipes. The Mustang Lithium’s internal combustion engine has been replaced by a Phi-Power dual-core electric motor and dual inverters.

The Mustang Lithium was built by Ford in collaboration with supplier Webasto. It’s a chance for the latter to show off its EV tech — and Ford to preview the future of electrified performance.

Under the hood of the Mustang Lithium. It’s a whole new world.

Save for the electric blue accents and a large touchscreen, the interior of the Mustang Lithium looks surprisingly production-plausible.

We expect to see something like the Mustang Lithium’s 10.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system on future Ford product.

Ford hasn’t disclosed range or charging time for the Mustang Lithium.

The bigger question is at what point sales of an electric Mustang could overtake sales of the gas-engined model; Ford is widely expected to field an electric model to be sold alongside a gas-engined one, as part of a greater Mustang-badged lineup of vehicles.  

“It doesn’t need to have a Mustang name on it, but we chose the first vehicle on this platform to be a Mustang,” Heiser said in the same interview, suggesting there is a greater variety of EVs in the pipeline that will use the Mach-E platform. 

In any case, it’s too early to worry about the departure of the gas-engined Mustang: The next model will use the rear-wheel-drive Explorer platform that arrived earlier this year, and is expected to be offered in hybrid form. So the gas-engined Mustang will be with us for a while. But with the Mustang Mach-E, Ford now also has an EV platform that could be scaled down a bit to accommodate a coupe body, something Heiser hinted at in his comments to Motoring. It’s difficult to picture a fuller lineup of EVs from Ford in the first half of the next decade without a coupe, especially now that Mustang is gently shifting to a performance sub-brand status.

It’s best to start getting mentally ready now for having a choice of a gas or electric Mustang at a Ford dealer in the 2020s.

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