Zagato twofer: Aston Martin reveals DBS GT Zagato and DB4 GT Continuation





















One of the reasons some of us like shopping at Costco is that you can get a lot of items in a twofer two-pack. While this has often applied to items like shampoo, steaks, Star Wars figures and laundry detergent, it has not generally applied to supercars. Yet here we are.

Aston Martin used the inaugural Audrain’s Newport Concours and Motor Week to take the wraps off the all-new DBS GT Zagato, and the all-old DB4 GT Zagato Continuation, which will be sold only as a pair. And only 19 pairs will be made.

Let’s talk about the new car first, since we’re already familiar with the old one: the DBS GT Zagato features just about all of the hallmark design cues of the Italian carrozzeria, which is celebrating its centenary this year, including a large round grille, an extended front overhang, a short tail, a double-bubble roof and small, triangular quarter windows.

“The design studio at Aston Martin has risen to the task magnificently, working alongside Andrea (Zagato) and his team,” said Aston Martin Executive Vice President and Chief Creative Officer Marek Reichman. “They have taken the already fabulous DBS Superleggera and shaped it into something which retains its Aston Martin identity, yet expresses itself as only a Zagato can. It is the modern expression of a timeless icon.”

The DBS GT Zagato is based on the DBS Superleggera and powered by a twin-turbocharged 5.2-liter V12 good for 760 hp, dialed up from the 715 hp on tap in the Superleggera. Finished in Supernova Red, the model features a number of unique interior items that were 3D-printed in metal, given the exceedingly small production run of this model.

“Featuring a world first, DBS GT Zagato utilizes the first automotive application of configurable carbon and metal 3D-printed interior finishes,” the automaker says. “A beautiful central ‘saddle’ design features a unique parametric, inter-locking form, available in a range of three materials and finishes. This includes the choice of printed Carbon, Aluminum, or – as part of the Centenary Specification – Gold PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition).”

Aston Martin says that the gold physical vapor deposition process requires almost 100 hours of print time to finish, not including the additional post-processing and polishing needed. Those customers requiring additional features will be able to request the talents of Q by Aston Martin (who is, unfortunately, not actor Ben Whishaw but rather a team of engineers and artisans).


The other half of the two-fer deal is a a DB4 GT Zagato continuation car — more of an artisanal achievement than a purely technological one at this point — built at the Heritage Division headquarters in Newport Pagnell using a mix of Sir David Brown-era craftsmanship and a dash of modern engineering for some convenience.

“Aston Martin’s elegance, class and purity of style have always blended perfectly with our own rationalistic design language,” said Andrea Zagato, Chief Executive Officer of the design consultancy. “Zagato’s Centenary represents a bridge between the past and the future, strengthened by the shared vision for an innovative approach to collectibles, recently coupled in pairs and twins with the aim to reach new standards of exclusivity in the world.”

How much is this two-pack? 6 million pounds, which translates to about $7.4 million. So it’s not quite a bargain per se, but we’d imagine the two cars could cost more separately; it’s hard to tell based on the hours required to build each, because the build costs and hours to Aston Martin are probably quite uneven, with the continuation car requiring about ten times the build hours if we had to guess.

So is this really a twofer, or just a two-pack that could cost less if each car was bought individually? Aston Martin won’t disclose the build costs for each, so we’ll likely never know. But the automaker won’t lose money with this deal.


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