Ten key design points on the new Ferrari SF1000

Using the Ferrari SF90 that raced last year as a yardstick with Giorgio Piola’s latest sketches of the SF1000 overlaid, let’s dive in and unlock the differences between these two machines…

Ferrari SF1000 front wing detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 front wing detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 sidepods detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 sidepods detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 rear detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 halo detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF1000 rear detail

Photo by: Ferrari

Ferrari SF90 and Ferrari SF1000 comparison

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

How did Ferrari get to this point? Here are the key elements of 2019’s SF90 contender…

Ferrari SF90 front wing

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The cape solution introduced by Ferrari in Singapore last season

Ferrari SF90, front nose underneath

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The underside of the cape solution introduced by Ferrari in Singapore last season

Ferrari SF90, nose

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The turning vanes used by Ferrari in 2019 started a little further back down the car

Ferrari SF90 front brakes comparison

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The blown axle (inset) had been banned for 2019 and so Ferrari looked for ways to recover some of the aerodynamic benefits it’s lost

Ferrari SF90, bargeboard

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari repeatedly made improvements to its bargeboards throughout 2019 but none of the solutions used last year hold a candle to the complexity of the ones presented so far in 2020

Ferrari SF90 side detail

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari was first to use the almost universally-adopted sidepod design back in 2017 but that hasn’t stopped them refining it ever since. Here in 2019 we can see how far the design had come, but for 2020 the team seem to have progressed yet one step further

McLaren MP4-20 2005 airbox horns

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

McLaren introduced these ‘Viking horns’ back in 2005, a feature that’s been repurposed by Ferrari for the prevailing regulations

Ferrari SP90, rear wing endplate

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The engine cover and surrounding bodywork was already pretty slim last year, as evidenced here. But, the SF1000 takes things to an entirely different level

Ferrari SF90, floor sensor detail

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The bodywork at the rear of the SF90, seen here, already tapered in significantly but now seems bloated when compared with this year’s challenger

 

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